Music Box Buys Francois Ozon’s Star-Studded Period Comedy ‘The Crime is Mine’ for the U.S. (EXCLUSIVE)

Music Box Films has bought U.S. rights to “The Crime Is Mine” (“Mon Crime”), a period comedy by French helmer François Ozon (“Swimming Pool,” “8 Women”).

“The Crime Is Mine” stars Rebecca Marder and Nadia Tereszkiewicz, who just won the Cesar Award for female newcomer, alongside Isabelle Huppert, Fabrice Luchini, Dany Boon and André Dussolier. Music Box Films plans a theatrical release for later this year, followed by a home entertainment rollout.

Adapted from a 1934 play by Georges Berr and Louis Verneuil, “The Crime Is Mine” follows struggling actress Madeleine (Tereszkiewicz), and her best friend and roommate Pauline (Marder), an unemployed lawyer in 1930s Paris. Madeleine ascends to fame after standing trial for the murder of a movie producer, with Pauline serving as defense counsel and media circus ringmaster. Upon Madeleine’s acquittal, a new life of fame, wealth and tabloid celebrity awaits — until the truth comes out.

The acquisition marks Music Box Films’ fifth collaboration with Ozon, having previously distributed his French period comedy “Potiche” ($1.6 million at the U.S. box office), “Frantz,” “By the Grace of God” and most recently “Summer of ‘85.”

A well polished crowdpleaser, “The Crime Is Mine” has been Ozon’s biggest commercial hit in the last decade based on its B.O. across Europe.

“We are thrilled to work again with one of the most essential and prolific contemporary French filmmakers, who’s fashioned a delightful comedy that pays homage to ’30s screwball style with the verve of a true cinephile,” said Music Box Films’ Brian Andreotti. “Despite its period setting, Ozon’s deft reckoning with issues of gender, sexuality and power dynamics truly position this as a film for our times.”

Nicolas Brigaud-Robert, Playtime’s CEO, said Music Box Films and Playtime “have been working together successfully for over a decade, it is only natural that we work with them on our biggest French film of the year.”

Brigaud-Robert negotiated the deal on behalf of the filmmakers with William Schopf and Andreotti of Music Box Films.

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